Website under construction

cave diving training Alessandro Reato

Mul Tun

Mul TunIn July 2015 I've been invited by my friend and explorer Luis L. to dive in a recently discovered cenote, located north of Dos Ojos cave system. Luis, within few dives, could lay a little more than 1 km of line (3500 feet) towards the north-west, up to arrive close to another entrance.

Walking in the jungle I could find the cenote which made the Mul Tun cave to be a system; this is a 10 m vertical pit where it was neccessary to build two superimposed ladders to arrive to the water surface. From them the name of the cenote: Ka Eeb, which means "two ladders" in mayan language.



Mul TunIn a serie of dives starting from cenote Ka Eeb I continued the exploration of the system for 1851 m (6074 feet) of new caves.
The most evident passage was towards west but the absence of flow made me suspect the near end of the cave. By the way, the cave is super decorated with brilliant white speleothems and nice shelfstones on the floor.

I could then find the alive section of the cave with its upstream, directly to the north; over a couple of restrictions the cave become bigger again, alternating deep passages and break downs.
The flow is constant and quite evident, despite the abnormal direction from north-east to south-west. This is due to a geological block more on the east and north, which stops also other caves belonging to the cave system Koox Baal.

Mul Tun cave system has been connected to Koox Baal cave system in April 2016, through its Wa Baax Yan section.